Much of this can be attributed to admission officers’ personalized approach to student recruitment. They have built relationships with schools and organizations in previously untapped regions, such as California, and made more than 1,200 admissions visits last year. This infographic breaks down the numbers.

Application Growth

4 Comments

  1. Kenneth A. Briggs says:

    Motives and strategies matter more to me than numbers. Many colleges are boasting applications boosts for various reasons: to reduce acceptance rates in the race to promote rankings; to strengthen a “national” marketing profile; to raise academic quality; to add to the image of diversity. In the case of Lafayette, does the initiative mean more poor students are being recruited and that inner city schools in poverty areas are being regularly visited — or that more upper middle and upper class students are being encouraged (class counts more than ethnicity or race I believe)? Does the college still employ recruiters in foreign countries to increase applicants from wealthy schools? Is more aid available to students whose families are at the low end of the income scale? Have application standards shifted, making it less costly and perhaps easier to show casual interest that the college counts as an application? None of these issues is addressed in the chart that is selective and summarizing at best.

    Thank you, Kenneth A. Briggs

  2. Amos Han '14 says:

    I would love to see an increase in international applicants from South Korea sometime in the future!

  3. Greg MacDonald says:

    Thanks for the kind words-

    Greg M

  4. Thomas H. Bruggink says:

    When many question the addition of new administrative staff at colleges, they tend to ignore that there are areas of college bureaucracy that are directly productive in a visible way. Lafayette admissions and development offices are to be applauded.

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